Music Recommendation: “Vegemite Meatballs” by Big Burger of Australia

BRUCE’S RECOMMENDATION OF BANDCAMP MUSIC YOU WILL PROBABLY NEVER HEAR ON THE RADIO

Song: “Vegemite Meatballs” on the album PERFECT MENU

Artist: Big Burger

Artist Location: Grafton, New South Wales, Australia

Info: “I was searching for Burger Big, an Athens, Ohio, band on Bandcamp — they’re great, so check them out — when I came across Big Burger. This was a happy accident because Big Burger is an Australian band that is also great. I love their straight instrumentals with no vocals. Both bands are great so check both of them out. Favorite track: Vegemite Meatballs.” — Bruce

Genre: Mostly Rock Instrumental

Price: $1 (AUS) for the 12-song album / That’s roughly 70 cents in US money — the price of a few sips of coffee

If you are OK with paying for it, you can use PAYPAL or CREDIT CARD

https://bigburger.bandcamp.com/album/perfect-menu

David Bruce: The Coolest People in Art — Comics

Comics

• In 1976, graphic storyteller Jim Steranko created, wrote, and drew the graphic novel Chandler: Red Tide. According to Mr. Steranko, “It’s a homage to the great noir films. It’s not comic book storytelling; it’s cinematic storytelling. I only had a few months, so I lived in my studio. I covered the windows over with cloth, so I could never tell when it was day or night. I ate at the board. I slept at the board. I played only jazz from that period, the 1940s, and that kept my creative blood up.” Mr. Steranko also created 29 comic books — this is not a huge number, but in them he used techniques that had never been used before. He says, “A number of experts have gone through those books: one said he found 150 narrative devices that had never been done in comic books before. I remember in one of the stories, there was a man and a woman talking. The woman was suddenly very cold, and her answer was an empty balloon. To give it an extra punch, I had icicles hanging from the balloon. That may seem like a small point, but it had never been done before.” The person who wrote the foreword for Mr. Steranko’s 2-volume History of Comic Bookswas the great film director Federico Fellini, creator of . Mr. Steranko sent him a telegram, and Mr. Fellini sent back the foreword. Mr. Steranko says, “Fellini as a kid had translated American comics, particularly Flash Gordon, into Italian. In return I sent him the [illustrated book] cover that had 50 characters on it. He sent me this beautiful note back that said, ‘I am hanging this above my desk in my office, because I think the magic and mystery of the characters will rub off on all of my projects.’”

• Can violence be entertaining? In real life, no. In comics, very. Diane DiMassa is the creator of the character Hothead Paisan, Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist, who stars in many comics and who gleefully uses violence to solve her problems. In one comic, Hothead and the woman she loves, Daphne, sit happily on a park bench, when a big man sits by Hothead and invades her space by spreading his legs wide open so that one of his legs touches her. Hothead does give the sinner a chance to reform as she looks down at his leg, then says to him, “Uh, pardon me ….” Unfortunately, the big man interrupts her with, “Whatcher problem?” When words won’t work, Hothead takes action. She hacks his leg off with a hatchet (for Hothead, coming up with the appropriate weapon is not a problem), hands the severed leg to the big man, and says, “This is my problem! Does this belong to you? Because if it does, I found it way over here in MY space!” (Far from regarding Hothead as promoting violence, I personally believe that the character promotes good etiquette.)

• Simpsonscreator Matt Groening met one of his heroes in May 1998, after he heard that Charles Schultz, creator of Peanuts, was eating lunch in town. Mr. Groening raced across town and went into the restaurant where Mr. Schultz was eating. He then thanked him for creating his very favorite Peanutscartoon, which showed Lucy making lots of tiny snowmen, stomping on them, and then telling Charlie Brown, “I’m torn between the desire to create and the desire to destroy.” Mr. Groening told Mr. Schultz, “Thank you for that strip. In one sentence you summed up my life.”

• Some events that might be seen as revolutionary are treated in a very matter-of-fact way. For example, in 1968, Charles Schultz, creator of Peanuts, quietly introduced a black child, Franklin, into his comic strip. Franklin attended a non-segregated school, and he went on non-segregated school trips, and this was accepted as a matter of course, without fanfare, as it should be. (And who knows? Maybe Peppermint Patty is a baby lesbian. In any case, Mr. Schultz, his characters, and his readers accepted her remarkable athletic ability, which can be seen as revolutionary — for the time — in a girl.)

• Comic-book artist Jack Kirby once attended a comic-book art festival at a public library in Los Angeles. One of the librarians asked him whether, in his opinion, comic books mirrored reality. Mr. Kirby replied, “No, comics transcend reality.” The librarian then stated, “If you were to mirror reality, then perhaps others could begin to understand it.” This is something that Mr. Kirby strongly disagreed with. He told the librarian, ‘Madam, when you mirror reality, you see it all backward. When you start transcending it, that’s when you have a real good shot at figuring out what’s going on.”

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Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

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THE COOLEST PEOPLE IN ART

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Music Recommendation: “Fox On The Run” by Jenny Dee & The Deelinquents

BRUCE’S RECOMMENDATION OF BANDCAMP MUSIC YOU WILL PROBABLY NEVER HEAR ON THE RADIO

Song: “Fox On The Run”

Artist: Jenny Dee & The Deelinquents

Artist Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Info: “Jenny Dee & The Deelinquents started out playing music that sounded as if it could have been cut in 1964: “There isn’t a music on earth that better suits D’Angora’s voice than girl-group-era R&B, with bonus points for writing songs that hold their own next to the classics.“ – The Boston Phoenix”

Comes bound with another good song: “Don’t Tell Me”

Genre: Pop

Price: $1 (US)

If you are OK with paying for it, you can use PAYPAL or CREDIT CARD

https://jennydee.bandcamp.com/album/dont-tell-me-b-w-fox-on-the-run

 

David Bruce: The Coolest People in Art — Clothing, Collections and Collectors

Clothing

• Al Capp, the creator of the comic strip Li’l Abner, was born in 1909 and lost his left leg in a trolley car accident when he was nine years old. At this time, replacements for lost legs were made of wood — since then, they have much improved. As an adult, Mr. Capp was able to joke about the loss of his leg. He told people with two legs that he was only half as likely as they to catch athlete’s foot. He also pointed out that he saved money buying socks. He used to buy six pairs of socks at one time, nail one sock to his wooden leg, and take turns wearing the other 11 socks on his one remaining foot. And, of course, he was able to make millions of comic strip readers laugh with Li’l Abner.

• One of Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s masterpieces is the painting Madam Charpentier and Her Children. He dined often with the Charpentier family and even called himself the Charpentiers’ “artist-in-waiting.” Once, he showed up to dine but had forgotten to wear a jacket, which was the conventional clothing of the time. So that Mr. Renoir would not feel embarrassed, Georges Charpentier had the other male guests take off their jackets.

• Artist Edna Hibel simply didn’t care about clothing, preferring to wear her old, comfortable dresses. When she did buy a new dress, she let it hang in her closet for a year or two until she was used to it.

• Surrealist Salvador Dali once was invited to a party where everyone was to dress up in costumes representing their dreams — he attended dressed as a decomposing corpse.

Collections and Collectors

• Sergei Shchukin collected the paintings of Henri Matisse and other then-controversial artists such as Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, Claude Monet, and Vincent van Gogh when they were not popular. Even Mr. Shchukin had to take some time to get used to their new styles of painting. Mr. Shchukin visited Matisse’s studio and liked a still life, but he told Matisse that he would have to take it and live with it for a number of days, “and if I can bear it and remain interested in it, I’ll keep it.” Other people could not bear the then-new styles of art. A visitor to Mr. Shchukin’s house wrote — directly on a canvas by Monet! — some indignant words. Mr. Shchukin commissioned Matisse to create Dance IIand Musicfor his house. After they had been created, Mr. Shchukin wrote Matisse, “I am beginning to enjoy looking at your panel the Dance, and as for Music, that will come in time.” Mr. Shchukin was a champion of the controversial new art, and he — a stutterer — once showed a Gauguin he had bought to a visitor and said, “A ma-ma-madman painted it, and a ma-ma-madman bought it.” However, Mr. Shchukin truly did appreciate this art. About Matisse’s Moroccan Café, he wrote Matisse that he contemplated this painting — his favorite — not less than one hour each day.

• Wilson Mizner once married a rich society lady; unfortunately, she was tight with her money, and Mr. Mizner was very loose with money — his own and other people’s. Their house was filled with Old World art masterpieces, which Mr. Mizner longed to convert into cash, but they were officially the property of New York City — a gift to New York from Mrs. Mizner’s former husband. Therefore, knowing that many New Yorkers like a bargain, and knowing that many New Yorkers think that anything “hot” is a bargain, Mr. Mizner hired some impoverished artists to make copies of the paintings, then he opened an art studio on Fifth Avenue, and spread the word that bargains in Old World masterpieces could be had at the art studio, provided that you didn’t mind that the masterpieces were stolen property. Mr. Mizner never actually told anyone that the paintings were the genuine article — he merely hinted in his actions, such as furtively looking out the window at regular intervals, that they were genuine Old World masterpieces.

• In her old age, Mrs. Georges Kars, the widow of a Jewish painter who committed suicide while the Nazis were occupying Paris, owned a valuable — both artistically and financially — art collection. Some people wondered what would happen to her art collection when or before she died, and an art dealer upset her one day by insensitively asking, “Well, Mrs. Kars, now that you will soon have to prepare yourself for the long, long journey, what are the plans for your collection?”

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Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

THE COOLEST PEOPLE IN ART

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Music Recommendation: “Long Song of the Law” by Burger Big

BRUCE’S RECOMMENDATION OF BANDCAMP MUSIC YOU WILL PROBABLY NEVER HEAR ON THE RADIO

Song: “Long Song of the Law”

Artist: Burger Big

Artist Location: Athens, Ohio

Info: “Lots of talent is on display in this 4-and-a-half-minute instrumental. Well done, young sirs.” — Bruce

“I love this instrumental, and it figuratively kills me that I am the only person in the world who has bought a copy.” — Bruce

Genre: Rock Instrumental

Price: Name Your Price (Includes FREE)

If you are OK with paying for it, you can use PAYPAL

https://burgerbig.bandcamp.com/releases

davidbrucehaiku: the hell with

donald-trump-1547274_1280

https://pixabay.com/illustrations/donald-trump-politician-america-1547274/

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THE HELL WITH

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The hell with fascism

Bigotry, paranoia,

And fools who love lies

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David Bruce: The Coolest People in Art — Children, Christmas

Children

• Maurice Sendak, author and illustrator of such children’s classic picture books as Where the Wild Things Are and In the Night Kitchen, absolutely loved Mickey Mouse cartoons when he was a child, and he says that seeing one would throw him in a frenzy. His sister, Natalie, and brother, Jackie, agree. His sister remembers, “We knew it was coming, and Jackie would grab you by one arm and I would grab you by the other arm, and you would have a seizure.” Mr. Sendak says about Mickey, “I adored him, and I still do.”

• When she was a little girl, Maud Petersham loved her “Auntie” (her mother’s half-sister), with whom she and her three sisters stayed during the summers. At the end of one summer, rather than board the train that would take her home again, she hid until the train left. The result was that she was allowed to stay with Auntie for four years. Later, Maud and her husband, Miska Petersham, created many illustrated books for children, including The Christ Child(1931).

• Bob Weber is the creator of the syndicated comic strip Slylock Fox, in which the main character solves mysteries by using his knowledge of science. Among the products associated with this comic strip is a set of Slylock Fox Brain Bogglers mystery cards that can be purchased at stores. When Mr. Weber’s daughter was a little girl, she memorized all the answers. He said, “When I go out to libraries or stores to promote the set and the strip, she shouts out the answers. I have to ‘shhh’ her every time!”

• When Margaret Bourke-White was still in high school, her family took a vacation to Canada, where her father wanted to photograph some boys. Unfortunately, when the boys saw the camera, they stood still and ceased to act naturally. Thinking quickly, Margaret threw a coin onto the ground near their feet, the boys dove for the coin, and Margaret’s father got his photograph. Later, Margaret became a world-famous photographer.

• Children’s book illustrator Lisa Desimini used to do her friends’ art homework for them when she was small. One of her friends’ mothers liked a sunflower that she had painted so much that she hung the painting up in the living room — of course, the mother thought that her own daughter had created it.

• Even as a child, Spanish artist Salvador Dalí was sensitive to color. Once, his father sent him to buy two tortillas, but young Salvador returned with two rolls instead. His father asked why he had not gotten the tortillas, and Salvador replied, “I got rid of them — I didn’t like the yellow.”

• A friend of TV’s Mister Rogers used to paint trees when he was a little boy. Once, he painted a tree blue, and someone criticized his choice of colors. For years, he stopped painting trees — until a teacher told him that artists can paint things any color they want.

Christmas

• Andy Warhol was an interesting character. He was interested in money, and on 10 February 1966, he took out an ad in the Village Voicethat stated this: “I’ll endorse with my name any of the following: clothing AC-DC, cigarettes small, tapes, sound equipment, ROCK N’ ROLL RECORDS, anything, film, and film equipment, Food, Helium, Whips, MONEY!! love and kisses ANDY WARHOL EL 5-9941.” His body was in bad shape; for one thing, he was shot twice by Valerie Solanas, the sole member of SCUM: Society for Cutting Up Men. He also had a hernia, for which he wore an abdominal belt. His friend Brigid Berlin dyed the belts in various pretty colors. When he finally got a gall bladder operation — the aftermath of which killed him — he wore his trademark silver wig during the operation. Throughout his life, he used glue to make the wig stay put. And yet he was normal in many ways. His mother stayed with him until her declining health and senility made it too difficult for him, who spent much time away from their home, to take care of her. He sent her back to family members in Pittsburgh, and she soon died there. His diary contains an entry saying “at Christmas time I really think about my mother and if I did the right thing sending her back to Pittsburgh. I still feel so guilty.”

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Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

THE COOLEST PEOPLE IN ART

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davidbrucehaiku: Autumn Meal

food-2202381_1280

https://pixabay.com/photos/food-eat-diet-peanut-butter-jelly-2202381/

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AUTUMN MEAL

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Hot tomato soup

Peanut butter and jelly

Oh so perfect meal

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