Music Recommendation: Intóxicos — “End Times”

BRUCE’S RECOMMENDATION OF BANDCAMP MUSIC

Music: “Disaster”

Album: END TIMES

Artist: Intóxicos

Artist Location: Vila Velha, Brazil

Record Company: Reverb Brasil

Record Company Location: Brazil

Info: Brazilian Surf Revival Music

Price: $1 (USD) for track; $5 (USD) for 10-track album

Genre: Surf. Rock. Instrumental.

Links:

Intóxicos

https://intoxicos.bandcamp.com

END TIMES

https://intoxicos.bandcamp.com/album/end-times

Reverb Brasil

https://reverbbrasil.bandcamp.com

David Bruce: The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Children

Children

• Dreamstime.com is a site where designers can go to buy stock photographs for use in advertisements, flyers, pamphlet and book covers, etc. Of course, the photographers enjoy seeing how their photographs are used — and sometimes the models in the photographs are excited. For example, a photographer who goes by the name Kelliem (her full name is confidential) was excited that a photograph of her 13-year-old daughter appeared on the cover of the young-adult novel Faking Sweet by J.C. Burke. However, another person was even more excited than she. On a message board at dreamstime.com, Kelliem wrote, “I was very excited to find a picture of my daughter on the cover of a teenage novel, although not quite as excited as my 13-year-old daughter — she wanted to buy all the books!”

• It took an eight-year-old girl to turn Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling into a published (and multi-millionaire) author. Several publishers rejected the first Harry Potter manuscript, and eventually Ms. Rowling’s agent gave a sample to Nigel Newton, chairman of Bloomsbury Publishing. He took the sample home but did not read it himself. Instead, he gave it to Alice, his eight-year-old daughter, who took it to her room and read it. Mr. Newton says, “She came down from her room an hour later glowing, saying, ‘Dad, this is so much better than anything else.’ She nagged and nagged me in the following months, wanting to see what came next.” Because she kept nagging him for more chapters about Harry Potter, he decided that the book was a winner. The rest of the story is publishing history.

• Gary Paulsen, author of Hatchet, once wrote a book about a cousin who had peed on an electric fence — an action that caused him to do a back flip. One day, he saw his son walking funny and asked what had happened. His son replied that he had been doing an experiment, and Mr. Paulsen immediately guessed, “Pee on the electric fence?” His son admitted that that was exactly what had happened, then asked, “Will I ever stop doing things like this?” Because Mr. Paulsen believes that such behavior is genetic, he replied negatively, saying, “It’s the way we are.” His son sighed, then said, “At least I know what that’s like and don’t have to pee on any more fences.”

• When children’s book illustrator Julie Downing was a young girl, she became upset because the Hardy Boys books had written on the back, “These books are perfect for boys from 8 to 14.” A rebellious girl, she read them, and she decided to become a detective like the Hardy Boys. One day, while pretending to be a detective, she decided that a neighbor’s swimming pool had been poisoned, so to decontaminate it she filled a bucket with ketchup, food coloring, salad dressing, and whatever other liquids or semi-liquids she could find. She then dumped it in the neighbor’s swimming pool — this incident ended her career as a detective.

• When Joan Lowery Nixon, who wrote many mysteries for young readers, won her second Edgar Award for outstanding mystery writing, a woman asked her, “You’ve done so well with your books for children — why don’t you try writing a real book?” However, Ms. Nixon felt that children’s books are real books, and that they are harder to write than books for adults. After all, when a child grows bored with a book, the child stops reading it, so Ms. Nixon constantly revised her books until she knew that they would keep a child’s interest.

• Stan and Jan Berenstain, creators of the Berenstain Bears, sometimes use things that happen in their lives as part of their books. For example, when Jan was pregnant with Michael, she often held Leo, her small son, on her lap. Of course, as her womb grew more and more, her lap got smaller and smaller. Leo asked why this was happening, and that provided a good opportunity for Jan to tell him that he would get a little brother or sister soon. The disappearing lap appeared in the book The Berenstain Bears’ New Baby.

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Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

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