Music Recommendation: The Quentin Brothers — “Leaving All Behind”

BRUCE’S RECOMMENDATION OF BANDCAMP MUSIC

Music: “Leaving All Behind”

Artist: The Quentin Brothers

Artist Location: Porto Alegre, Brazil

Info: “‘Leaving All Behind’ is a song dedicated to the ones who had courage or had to start their lives all over again. People who left their previous way of living and traded it for something that was really worth living for, like a new place, new job, new relationship, new style and so many situations which gives meaning to life again.”

“The QUENTIN BROTHERS are a hot mix of Spaghetti Western, Country, Rock ‘n’ Roll and Surf Music.”

Roddy Rauvers – Vocals, Acoustic Guitar, Mandolin and Jaw Harp 
Henrique San – Bass 
Luis “William” Campbell – Guitar 
Tom Rocker – Drums 

Price: Name Your Price (Includes FREE)

Genre: Country. Country Rock.

Links:

The Quentin Brothers on Bandcamp

https://quentinbrothers.bandcamp.com/releases

My Beatles Birthday

Annette Rochelle Aben

One of my favorite songs is the Lennon/McCartney classic When I’m Sixty Four!

And it is especially poignant this year, as this IS my 64th birthday! (woo hoo) Which is why I call it my Beatles birthday…

I am most grateful for all of my years and have no problem stating, and owning my age. It is a milestone many have been deprived of experiencing. AND I have earned each and every grey hair, wrinkle, and creaky bone! So why not display them with enthusiasm!

A couple interesting things about this particular birthday is that number one, it is the second year in a row I have spent my birthday in a rehab/nursing home and it is the first I will NOT be allowed to spend it with family and friends due to the virus that has swept the planet. At least last year, I could have visitors and we…

View original post 229 more words

David Bruce: The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Public Speaking, Parents

Parents

• Young people’s novelist William Sleator grew up in a family of nonconformists at a time when conformity was a part of American life. (Unfortunately, that description doesn’t much narrow down when he grew up.) His best friend’s mother was a typical 1950s TV sitcom wife with a very clean house (and plastic covering the furniture), perfectly made-up face and hair, and no job. Meanwhile, William and his friend used to go to William’s house and do such fun activities as standing on the back porch railing and peeing into the backyard. (It’s a guy thing.) William’s mother was definitely laid-back. After William made the mistake of asking his best friend to spend the night, his best friend’s mother came over to meet the rest of William’s family. She was not impressed by what she saw. Mrs. Sleator was potting plants in the kitchen table, meaning dirt was present. Vicky, William’s sister, came into the kitchen, dropped an apple accidentally on the floor, then bit into the apple without first washing it. The best friend’s mother was shocked, but Mrs. Sleator — who worked as a pediatrician — explained, “It’s good for them to eat dirt off the floor. Dirt builds up immunity. I never wash food, never sterilized a bottle in my life. And my kids are never sick.” This did not go over well with the best friend’s mother, who was also shocked when Danny, one of William’s younger siblings, came into the kitchen while sucking his thumb. The best friend’s mother told Danny, “It’s not good to suck your thumb, dear.” Danny slowly took his thumb out of his mouth, but by then Mrs. Sleator was fed up and told her young son, “Danny, put your thumb back in your mouth.” Not surprisingly, the best friend’s mother decided not to allow her son to stay the night at the Sleators’ house.

• The mother of Anne McCaffrey, author of the Pern novels about telepathic dragons, had certain feelings that she ought to do one thing or another. For example, she once had the feeling that she ought to take the family’s money out of the stock market, so she did — right before the October stock market crash in 1929. Because of her special “sight,” her family escaped the brunt of the Great Depression. Anne’s father also had the “sight.” While serving in Italy during World War II, he felt that he should stop the car he was being transported in, so he did — then he discovered that the bridge that was supposed to have been just a few feet ahead was gone. If he had not stopped the car, he and his driver would have plunged into a ravine.

Public Speaking

• On a voyage, Mark Twain and Chauncey Depew were asked to speak after dinner. Mr. Twain spoke for 20 minutes and was a huge hit with the audience. Mr. Depew then arose and said, “Mr. Toastmaster and Ladies and Gentlemen, before this dinner Mark Twain and I made an agreement to trade speeches. He has just delivered my speech, and I thank you for the pleasant manner in which you received it. I regret to say that I have lost the notes of his speech and cannot remember anything he has to say.” Mr. Depew then sat down to much laughter. The next day a passenger on the ship said to Mr. Twain, “I consider you were much imposed upon last night. I have always heard that Mr. Depew is a clever man, but really, that speech of his you made last night struck me as being the most infernal rot.”

• After becoming famous, Erma Bombeck was often asked to do more public speaking across the country than any one person could do. Being a humorist, she found a comic way to politely say no to many requests: “I can’t be gone more than two days because that’s all the underwear we have.”

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Buy

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Kindle

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Apple

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Barnes and Noble

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Kobo

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Smashwords: Many Formats, Including PDF

Music Recommendation: Movie Star Trash — “La Curva del Diavolo (Live)”

BRUCE’S RECOMMENDATION OF BANDCAMP MUSIC

Music: “La Curva del Diavolo (Live)”

Album: AO VIVO CATIVEIRO BAR (LONDRINA​-​PR)

Artist: Movie Star Trash

Artist Location: Curitiba, Brazil

Info: All Songs by Movie Star Trash except “El dia de los Muertos” by Os Catalépticos.

Marc Rochadelli (Guitar)

Nei Rodrixx(Bass) –

Matheus Moro (Drum)

Price: FREE Download of 11-track album

Genre: Surf Music Instrumental.

Links:

Movie Star Trash

https://moviestartrash.bandcamp.com

AO VIVO CATIVEIRO BAR

https://moviestartrash.bandcamp.com/album/ao-vivo-cativeiro-bar-londrina-pr

David Bruce: The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Problem-Solving, Procrastination

Problem-Solving

• Although they were born in the United States and were American citizens, during World War II Yoshiko Uchida and Keiko (“Kay”) Uchida, her sister, were interned at the American concentration camp at Topaz, Utah, because of their Japanese ancestry. Before being moved to Topaz, they were first forced to live in a horse stall that had been painted so hurriedly by the United States soldiers that young Yoshiko could see the corpses of spiders and other bugs under the whitewash. Kay became ill and was forced to stay in bed and use a large tin can when she needed to go to the bathroom. She worried that everyone would hear what she was doing — the horse stall “apartments” were not conducive to privacy. Therefore, while Kay used the can, Yoshiko rustled newspapers and made a lot of noise to cover up the bathroom noises that her sister was making.

• On The Dick Van Dyke Show, Mel Cooley, played by Richard Deacon, was always being insulted by Buddy Sorrell, played by Morey Amsterdam. This got to Mr. Deacon after a while, so he talked to series creator Carl Reiner and asked him to write a response for his character to give to Buddy. Mr. Reiner tried a few ideas, but none seemed to work, so he asked Mr. Deacon what his reaction was to Buddy. Mr. Deacon answered “Yecch!” and that became his character’s response to Buddy.

• Elie Wiesel, author of Night, became an American citizen partly as a result of an accident. While crossing Times Square, he was hit by a taxi and forced to use a wheelchair for a year. His French visa was about to expire, and to renew it he needed to go to France, something that was difficult for him to do because of his injury. An American immigration official suggested that he solve the program by becoming an American citizen, and Mr. Wiesel did exactly that.

• When Jack Gantos, author of the Newbery Honor book Joey Pigza Loses Control, was doing time in prison for smuggling and selling drugs, he faced a problem. Prison guards would not allow prisoners to keep journals. To solve that problem, Mr. Gantos used a copy of Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov as his journal. He wrote in between the printed lines of the book.

Procrastination

• Richard P. Feynman, a Noble Prize winner in 1965, almost did not write the paper that won him the prize. Mr. Feynman preferred to talk rather than write, and his non-autobiographical books tend to be transcriptions of his lectures or notes for his lectures. While he was working on describing quantum processes, he invented what are known as “Feynman Diagrams.” The diagrams became popular quickly, but Mr. Feynman waited a year to write a technical paper describing his diagrams. However, he did finally write “Space-Time Approach to Quantum Electrodynamics” because he stayed at the home of his friends Bert and Mulaika Corben. Mulaika was both liberated and forceful, and she locked him in a room until he had finished writing the paper.

• Will Hobbs, author of such children’s books as Bearstone, has a unique way of getting himself to write when he is procrastinating too much. He winds up a toy pterodactyl and forces himself to begin writing before the pterodactyl stops walking.

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Buy

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Kindle

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Apple

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Barnes and Noble

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Kobo

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Smashwords: Many Formats, Including PDF

Music Recommendation: Doghouse Rose — “The Rose”

BRUCE’S RECOMMENDATION OF BANDCAMP MUSIC

Music: “The Rose”

Two-Track Single: THE BLURST OF TIMES

Artist: Doghouse Rose

Artist Location: Toronto, Canada

Info: “Doghouse Rose is rooted in melodic punk with a hint of new wave and good old-fashioned rock n roll, their vibrant melodies, thunderous rhythms, and candy-sweet vocals deliver stories of chasing dreams, hard-luck times and not taking life too seriously.”

Price: $1.50 (CAD) for two-track track

Genre: Pop Punk

Links:

Doghouse Rose on Bandcamp

https://doghouserose.bandcamp.com

THE BLURST OF TIMES

https://doghouserose.bandcamp.com/album/the-blurst-of-times

David Bruce: The Funniest People in Books — Prejudice, Problem-Solving

Prejudice

• At Central High School in Cleveland, Ohio, African-American writer Langston Hughes succeeded in a big way, writing for and publishing the school newspaper, working as class poet and yearbook editor, and acting in plays. While at Columbia University in New York City, Mr. Hughes hoped to be just as successful. Unfortunately, prejudice got in his way. When he tried to write for Columbia University’s newspaper, the editor played a cruel joke on him by telling him to cover fraternity and society news. Because of Mr. Hughes’ race, he was unable to attend fraternity and society events and so he could not write about them.

• When Yoshiko Uchida, author of Journey to Topaz, was a little girl growing up in California, she faced a lot of prejudice. As a member of the Girl Reserves, she was supposed to be photographed for the local newspaper along with the other Girl Reserves, who were Caucasian. The newspaper photographer tried to take the photograph without young Yoshiko, but one of her friends saw what the photographer was attempting to do, so she told Yoshiko, “Stand by me,” locked arms with her, and made it impossible for Yoshiko to be left out of the photograph.

• Paul Laurence Dunbar, the first African American to make his living as a writer, experienced prejudice. A wealthy white woman arranged for him to come to Buffalo, New York, and do a reading. She reserved an expensive suite in an excellent hotel for him, but the hotel management was shocked when Mr. Dunbar arrived. The clerk would not let him register at the hotel, and management threatened to call the police unless he left. Not until the wealthy white woman showed up in person was Mr. Dunbar allowed to stay at the hotel.

• Aaron Fricke (author of Reflections of a Rock Lobster: A Story About Growing Up Gay) and Paul Guilbert used to help handle telephone calls to a Gay Helpline. Most of the calls were serious, but cranks made some of them. Whenever a caller started gaybashing, Mr. Fricke or Mr. Guilbert would tell the caller to make a highly original use of the telephone receiver.

Problem-Solving

• An efficiency expert started working at a movie studio, but the screenwriters rebelled at such changes as pencil sharpeners being taken from their offices and replaced by a couple of pencil sharpeners in the hall. In addition, the efficiency expert stopped the deliveries of coffee to the writers’ rooms. One writer, Harry Ruskin, started using pencils at the phenomenal rate of three dozen an hour. The efficiency expert investigated and discovered that Mr. Ruskin was writing a few words with each pencil, then tossing them out of the window because “it wouldn’t be economical for a man making 50 cents a minute to walk down the corridor and sharpen them.” The efficient expert next discovered a group of writers gathered in the hall, where they had cut a hole in the rug, started a fire, and were making coffee because they claimed it was more efficient for them to make their own coffee than to walk to the commissary to buy it. The writers won — the efficiency expert was fired.

• Phillis Wheatley became America’s first African-American poet with the publication in 1773 of Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral. Phillis was a slave, but her owner, Susanna Wheatley, recognized her talent as a poet and worked to have Phillis’ book published. She even contacted British printer Archibald Bell about publishing Phillis’ book of poetry, and he said he would if Susanna could prove that Phillis was indeed the author of the poems. To prove that Phillis was the author, Susanna invited 18 respectable citizens living in Boston, including John Hancock, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, to quiz Phillis and ask her questions that would indicate whether she had the intelligence and talent to be the author of the poetry. They did, and all 18 of the judges signed a statement that Phillis was indeed the author of the poems.

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Buy

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Kindle

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Apple

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Barnes and Noble

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Kobo

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Smashwords: Many Formats, Including PDF

Music Recommendation: Sleater-Kinney — “Hurry on Home”

BRUCE’S RECOMMENDATION OF BANDCAMP MUSIC

Music: “Hurry on Home”

Album: THE CENTER WON’T HOLD

Artist: Sleater-Kinney

Artist Location: Portland, Oregon

Music Company: Mom+Pop

Music Company Location: New York, New York

Info: “Sleater-Kinney is an acclaimed, American rock band that formed in Olympia, Washington in 1994. The band’s core lineup consisted of Corin Tucker (vocals and guitar), Carrie Brownstein (guitar and vocals) and Janet Weiss (drums). Sleater-Kinney were known for their feminist, left-leaning politics and were an integral part of the riot grrrl and indie rock scenes in the Pacific Northwest.”

How does brokenness walk? Or move through the world?” says guitarist/vocalist Carrie Brownstein about The Center Won’t Hold, Sleater-Kinney’s tenth studio album. “We’re always mixing the personal and the political but on this record, despite obviously thinking so much about politics, we were really thinking about the person – ourselves or versions of ourselves or iterations of depression or loneliness – in the middle of the chaos.” 

The Center Won’t Hold is Sleater-Kinney’s midnight record on the doomsday clock. After twenty-five years of legendary collaboration, rock’n’roll giants Brownstein, Corin Tucker, and Janet Weiss rise to meet the moment by digging deeper and sounding bigger than we’ve heard them yet. Here are intimate battle cries. Here are shattered songs for the shattered survivors. “The Center Won’t Hold drops you into the world of catastrophe that touches on the election,” says guitarist/vocalist Tucker of the title track. “We’re not taking it easy on the audience. That song is meant to be really heavy and dark. And almost like a mission statement, at the end of that song, it’s like we’re finding our way out of that space by becoming a rock band.”

Price: $1 (USD) for track; $9.99 for 11-track album

Genre: Indie Rock

Links:

Sleater-Kinney on Bandcamp

https://sleaterkinney.bandcamp.com

THE CENTER WON’T HOLD

https://sleaterkinney.bandcamp.com/album/the-center-wont-hold

Mom+Pop

https://mompop.bandcamp.com/artists

THEY’RE AFRAID YOU WILL VOTE — The Reluctant Poet

By Charles Robert Lindholm

They

Are Afraid

You Will Vote

Them All Out Of

Office

So

Voter Suppression’s

Used To Keep

The Wrong People From

Voting – You!

Copyright © 2020 Charles Robert Lindholm – The Reluctant Poet

All Rights Reserved – 10-23-2020 – 5:45  p.m. Please Vote – For God’s Sake Vote!!

Please Come And Explore My Archives On The Poet’s Corner And […]

THEY’RE AFRAID YOU WILL VOTE — The Reluctant Poet

David Bruce: The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Practical Jokes, Prejudice

Practical Jokes

• When writer Dick DeBartolo began writing for MAD magazine, he quickly discovered that the employees engaged in a lot of good-natured ribbing. For example, he once brought a comic article to his boss, Nick Meglin, who laughed and laughed while reading the article. However, when Mr. DeBartolo asked which jokes he had laughed at most, Mr. Meglin replied, “None of the jokes. I was laughing at the typos. God, are you an awful speller!” (Don’t feel bad for Mr. DeBartolo — for a span of several years, every issue of MAD included at least one article by him.)

• As a child, Mark Twain used to play a practical joke on his mother. He would go to a cave (McDowell’s Cave, which served as the model for McDougal’s Cave in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer), capture a bat, put it in his pocket, take it home, and then tell his mother that he had something for her in his pocket. In his Autobiography, Mr. Twain marveled that his mother never learned to like bats: “The more experience she had, the more she could not change her views.”

• When artist Neysa McMein went to Paris, she asked writers Alexander Woollcott and Heywood Broun for the name of a good, cheap hotel she could stay in. Unfortunately, after she had arrived at the “hotel” and checked in, her friends Grace Moore and Cole Porter visited and revealed to her that she was staying in a brothel.

• While attending Cornell University, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., was required to take ROTC. At an ROTC inspection, Mr. Vonnegut once wore on his military uniform every medal he could borrow — he wore Boy Scout medals, medals for swimming, and even medals for Sunday School attendance.

Prejudice

• David Klass, children’s book author of California Blue and You Don’t Know Me, had a college professor father who embarrassed him when he was a child by volunteering to be his assistant baseball coach in a summer league. Some of the other fathers were racists and homophobes, including one father who played a discriminatory “game” while driving the children to an away baseball game. The “game” consisted of the father pretending his hand was a gun and cocking his finger then aiming at non-white people and saying “bang.” At least, the father was non-discriminatory in his hatred. Black, Hispanic, Asian didn’t matter to him — if someone was non-white, he aimed his “gun” at them and said “bang.” One day, when David’s professor father had his turn driving some children to an away game, one of the children saw two men walking together along the side of the road. The child rolled down the window and yelled, “Homos!” David’s professor father stopped the car by the side of the road, then he told the child, “Just for your information, homo- is a Greek root. It means ‘equal’ or ‘like.’ As in homogeneous. It also means ‘man,’ from the Latin. As in Homo sapiens. So if you were trying to say those two guys are alike, or that they’re both men, you were right. Otherwise you don’t know what you’re talking about.” Then he drove on. Today, Mr. Klass realizes how lucky he was to have a father like that.

• Emma Lazarus, a Jewish-American poet whose poem “The New Colossus” graces the base of the Statue of Liberty, was a defender of her people. When the Century magazine published an article by an important Russian scholar, Zinaida Alexievna Ragozin, Ms. Lazarus knew that the article had to be refuted because it stated that the Jewish people had brought the then-current, late 19th-century pogroms in Russia upon themselves through being “worshippers of the Golden Calf,” caring only about money, and plotting to destroy Russia. Ms. Lazarus asked the editor of the Century, Richard Watson Gilder, who would respond to and rebut the article, and Mr. Gilder responded, “You, of course.” Ms. Lazarus did exactly that.

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Buy

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Kindle

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Apple

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Barnes and Noble

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Kobo

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2 — Smashwords: Many Formats, Including PDF