Get Lost in a Book — Annette Rochelle Aben

When was the last time you told someone to GET LOST!

Well, if you’re an author, hopefully, it was just the other day.

People who love to read, don’t really need an invitation to get lost… in a book that is!  

September 6th, it is: NATIONAL READ A BOOK DAY Promote, as you see […]

Get Lost in a Book — Annette Rochelle Aben

David Bruce: The Funniest People in Sports: 250 Anecdotes — Money, Mothers

Money

• Competitive figure skating can be expensive. In 1995, Rudy Galindo retired from competitive figure skating because he didn’t have enough money to pay for training. However, the 1996 United States Championships were being held in his hometown of San Jose, California, so he entered. Smart move. Despite being an underdog, he won the gold medal and became THE story of the championships. His victory led to a career as a professional figure skater and lots of money for training.

• Figure skater Gary Beacom once felt that judge Kathy Casey had given him an unfairly low score at a competition, so he publicly skated over to her and handed her a dollar the next time he skated. He was satisfied with the result of his “bribe” — she gave him a higher score than she had the first time. Mr. Beacom joked, “It does seem possible to bribe the judges, even in broad daylight.”

• Figure skater Rosalynn Sumners had a tendency to put on weight. When she was skating for Disney, her contract required her to be weighed each week, and if she was three pounds over a certain weight, Disney fined her $10. After a while, Ms. Sumners began to stand on the scales each week with a $10 bill in her hand.

• Being a competitive figure skater can be expensive. Until 1995, Michelle Kwan wore only used skates, partly because they were more comfortable and partly because they were cheaper. In fact, her father sold their house and moved his family in with Michelle’s grandparents so he could raise money for her training.

• Winning a championship in the modern Olympic Games means a great deal, and it meant a great deal in the ancient world. For example, for the rest of their lives ancient Olympic champions did not have to pay taxes!

Mothers

• When Carol Heiss was a little girl, her ice skating teacher urged her parents to hire a professional coach for her. However, coaching is expensive, and Mr. Heiss’ salary was enough only to support his family. Nevertheless, Mr. and Mrs. Heiss asked the teacher how good their daughter could be with the best coaching. The teacher replied, “We believe that if she studies hard, in ten years she can be the champion of the world.” Immediately, Mrs. Heiss began working at a part-time job. Carol did study hard, and Mrs. Heiss saw Carol win her first world championship. (Carol went on to win four more world championships.) Unfortunately, Mrs. Heiss died of cancer shortly before Carol won a gold medal at the 1960 Olympics. When the medal was given to Carol, she whispered, “It’s for you, Mother. I promised.”

• Tiger Woods’ mother, Kultida, wanted her son to grow up to be a good sportsman. She once made Tiger watch tennis brat John McEnroe on television. When Mr. McEnroe argued a call that an official had made, she told Tiger, “See that? Never that! I don’t like that. I will not have my reputation as a parent ruined by that.” At a golf tournament, Tiger hit a bad shot and angrily hit his golf bag with his club. His mother immediately reported him to the tournament director and demanded that he be penalized two strokes. When Tiger complained, she said, “Who made the bad shot? Whose fault? You want to hit something? Hit yourself in the head!”

• When world-class figure skater Tiffany Chin was eight years old, she received a gift from her mother — her very first pair of skates, which cost $1 at a garage sale. Tiffany was very happy to receive the slightly used skates, but of course, she didn’t look like a world-class figure skater her first time on the ice. Instead, she did what everyone does the first time they try to skate — she fell down. Later, of course, she improved dramatically. In 1985, she was the United States Ladies National Champion, and in 1985 and 1986, she was the World Bronze Medalist.

• In 1986, Lyn St. James was involved in a crash while racing in California at the Riverside International Raceway. Her car was bumped by another car, then her car sped out of control and several other cars hit it. As her car burst into flames, Ms. St. James crawled out, then walked to a telephone. The race was being televised, and she knew her mother would be worried about her, so she called immediately to say that she was all right.

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

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WWW Wednesday 14-Jul-2021 — HappymessHappiness

Welcome to this week’s WWW Wednesday hosted by Sam from Taking On A World of Words.

As usual, just answer the three W questions: What did you recently finish reading?

What are you currently reading?

What do you think you’ll read next?

Recently Finished Currently Reading Up Next

How was your reading week? Have you […]

WWW Wednesday 14-Jul-2021 — HappymessHappiness

David Bruce: 250 Anecdotes About Religion — Tobacco, Wills, Wisdom

Tobacco

• A Mennonite pastor punished his five-year-old son by removing him from church — an act the son felt was very unfair. To get revenge, the young boy waited until later in the day, when he and his father attended a men’s business meeting, then the boy announced to the group, “My dad will probably deny this, but he smokes sometimes!”

• One Church of Christ preacher, Jimmy Smith, caught another Church of Christ preacher, T.Q. Martin, smoking. Mr. Smith said, “I see you’re burning incense to the devil.” Mr. Martin replied, “Yes, but I didn’t expect him to catch me at it.”

Wills

• Wilson Mizner, a rascal, led a life devoted to women, gambling, opium, and the spending of money — and he also devoted his life to wit. After he died, he made one last joke in his will: He left his estate to a woman. Everybody assumed, given the life Mr. Mizner had led, that the woman must have been his mistress, but she was a woman with whom he had had a Platonic friendship for the 15 years he knew her. The woman, Florence Atkinson, called him “the best and dearest friend I ever had in my whole life. … I know [his brother] Addison almost as well as Wilson. We were like three brothers.”

• Revolutionary War general Charles Lee made an infamous will that said, “I desire most earnestly that I may not be buried in any church, or church-yard, or within a mile of any Presbyterian or Anabaptist meeting-house; for since I have resided in this country, I have kept so much bad company when living, that I do not chuse to continue it when dead.”

Wisdom

• Rabbi Joshua ben Hananiah was ugly, and the daughter of the Emperor of Rome told him that she thought it was odd that so ugly a man could have such wisdom. He then asked if the Emperor kept wine in earthen vessels. She replied that he did, and Rabbi Joshua told her that it was odd to keep such a good thing as wine in earthen vessels and that the Emperor ought to keep his wine in golden and silver vessels. She told the Emperor what Rabbi Joshua had said, and the Emperor ordered that his wine be kept in golden and silver vessels — but the golden and silver vessels turned the wine sour. Therefore, the Emperor called Rabbi Joshua before him. Rabbi Joshua explained what he and the Emperor’s daughter had discussed, and he stated that he had merely repeated to the Emperor’s daughter the same principle she had told to him — good things should not be kept in common vessels. The Emperor then asked, “Are there no handsome scholars?” Rabbi Joshua replied, “If the scholars were ugly, they would be even more scholarly.”

• A man planted flowers in his garden; however, when the flowers grew, dandelions also grew with them. The man sought advice from friends and tried several ways to get rid of the dandelions, but nothing worked. Finally, the man sought advice from a wise gardener. The wise gardener suggested several ways to get rid of the dandelions, but the man had already tried them. Finally, the wise gardener said, “I suggest that you learn to love dandelions.”

• Many people are in despair over their evil deeds, but instead of turning from evil and doing good, they continue to despair although they instead “could be stringing pearls for the delight of Heaven,” in the words of the Rabbi of Ger. That is why the good Rabbi said, “It is written: ‘Depart from evil and do good’ — turn wholly from evil, do not dwell upon it, and do good. You have done wrong? Then counteract it by doing right.”

• During a sea voyage, a storm raged. A passenger on ship began to scream for help, and his shrieking disturbed the other passengers, who asked the wise Bahlul what could be done to quiet the panicked passenger. “Tie a rope to him and throw him overboard,” Bahlul said. “Just before he drowns, drag him on board. Then he will realize that he is safe on board this ship.”

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

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David Bruce: 250 Anecdotes About Religion — Prejudice, Public Speaking, Respect

Prejudice

• Jewish comedian Lenny Bruce was in a diner on Sunset Boulevard when a tough-looking man got off his motorcycle, walked in, and said, “I’m gonna kill me every Jew in this place.” Mr. Bruce immediately began singing, “When Israel was in Egypt land, let my people go.” He got the worst of the fight, but he amused police officers with his comedy when they arrived to stop the disturbance.

• Morris K. Udall, a Mormon and later a politician from Arizona, ran into bigotry while serving in the Army. An Army Major asked, “Morris? What kind of a name is that?” Later, Mr. Udall received a letter from “Judge Levi Udall,” and immediately the Major thought that he was Jewish, so the Major began to treat him exactly like he treated all of his Jewish officers — badly.

Public Speaking

• In the old days, many people regarded playing cards as irreligious. Susan B. Anthony, a Quaker, gave a speech in which she introduced a Methodist friend of hers, the Reverend Anna Howard Shaw, as her “right bower,” thinking that a right bower was a right-hand man and not knowing that a right bower is a leading card in the game of euchre. The audience laughed, mystifying Ms. Anthony, until the meaning of “right bower” was explained to her later. The next day Ms. Anthony again addressed the audience, and she said, “When I came to your town, I had been warned that you were a very religious lot of people. I wanted to impress upon you that Miss Shaw and I are religious, too. But I admit that when I told you she was my right bower I did not know what a right bower was. I have learned that since last night.” The audience laughed, then Ms. Anthony continued, “It interests me very much, however, to realize that every one of you seemed to know all about a right bower, and that I had to come to your good orthodox town to get that information.”

• Cordell Brown says that having cerebral palsy can be an advantage in public speaking, which he has often done to raise money for Camp Echoing Hills, a camp he founded in Warsaw, Ohio, for adults with handicaps. Because the cerebral palsy affects his speech and coordination, no one can tell when Mr. Brown is nervous. He sometimes used to put his hands in his pockets at the beginning of his fund-raising speech, and then tell the audience, “I’ve got my hands in my pockets to start this presentation because by the end of the evening, I’ll have them in your pockets.” Of course, having cerebral palsy does have disadvantages. Early one Saturday morning, Mr. Brown was at a car wash when a police car pulled in with its lights flashing. Someone had seen Mr. Brown washing his car, noticed that he was uncoordinated (an effect of cerebral palsy), thought he was drunk, and called the police!

• Some politicians change political parties. For example, Reverend W.H. Bill Alexander started out as a Democrat, but he changed his affiliation to Republican. In 1950, he ran against the junior senator from Oklahoma, A.S. Mike Monroney. Senator Monroney’s senior colleague, Bob Kerr, campaigned for him. In a devastating reference to Reverend Alexander, Senator Kerr said, “Now, this fellow Alexander one day said to his congregation, ‘After communion with the Almighty, I have decided to enter the Democratic primaries and run for the Senate.’ Well, soon afterward, Alexander switched over and won the Republican nomination. What I’d like to know is this: If the Lord told Bill Alexander to run as a Democrat, who then told him to run as a Republican?”

Respect

• As a young boy, while in the Potala Palace, the 14th Dalai Lama enjoyed looking at people in the Tibetan capital city, Lhasa, through his telescope. Sometimes he looked at the people in the prison at the base of the hill the palace was situated on. Whenever the prisoners noticed that the Dalai Lama was looking at them through the telescope, they knelt to show him respect.

• When Rumi, the founder of the Sufi order known as the Whirling Dervishes, died, many Jews and Christians showed up at his funeral. The Muslims were surprised that these non-Muslims wanted to attend the funeral of an eminent Muslim saint and sage, but they explained the great respect that they had for Rumi, and so they were allowed to attend his funeral.

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

250 Anecdotes About Religion — Buy

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David Bruce: 250 Anecdotes About Religion — Prayer

Prayer

• A deeply religious woman was shocked when her 14-year-old son revealed that he was gay, and so she did what deeply religious people should do — she prayed for guidance. Very quickly, she received an answer to her prayers. God said to her, “You know what a gay person is like; you lived with one for 14 years.” After hearing that, she decided that the problem was not homosexuality, but some people’s negative reaction to homosexuality. She says, “From that moment on, I never shed another tear that my son was gay. I may have shed a lot of tears for how he was treated, but not because he was gay.” (The woman’s husband quickly accepted his son’s homosexuality, saying simply, “He’s a nice boy, and I love him.”)

• In 1962, in Engel v. Vitale, the United States Supreme Court ruled against allowing a nondenominational prayer to be recited in New York Public Schools. It was a controversial decision, but many people supported it. President John F. Kennedy expressed the opinion that children could learn about prayer much more meaningfully at home and in church. Many religious leaders expressed the opinion that nondenominational prayers, such as the one that had been recited in the New York City schools, were bland, vague, and almost meaningless — hardly the stuff of real prayer.

• For much of his political career, Alabama politician George Wallace was a strict segregationist, but eventually he changed and admitted that he had been wrong about segregation. In 1987, Reverend Jesse Jackson went to Mr. Wallace’s home, and Mr. Wallace asked, “Would you pray for me?” They joined hands, and Reverend Jackson prayed for him. According to Mr. Wallace’s son, both Mr. Wallace and Reverend Jackson had tears in their eyes. At the end of the prayer, Mr. Wallace told Reverend Jackson, “Jesse, I love you.” Reverend Jackson replied, “Governor, I love you, too.”

• In 1982, Lebanon and Israel were in conflict. Mother Teresa traveled to Lebanon, where she asked to be allowed to take care of disabled children still present in hospitals that had been bombed. The authorities did not see what she would be able to accomplish during a time of fighting, so they asked her to wait for a ceasefire to start doing her good works. Mother Teresa prayed, and the very next day a ceasefire was declared. She then took the disabled children to East Beirut, where the Missionaries of Charity had a home and could take care of them.

• In the first half of the 20th century, Ed Diddle coached the football team of Western Kentucky State Teachers College — the Praying Colonels. Mr. Diddle once coached his team captain in how to say a prayer properly — one should ask for one’s team to give a good performance on the playing field, but one should not ask for victory. Before the game, the team captain started to pray, but in the middle of the prayer, Mr. Diddle interrupted: “Damn it! I told you not to ask for victory!”

• Rabbi Bunam prayed quietly, but in his youth Rabbi Hanokh of Alexandria prayed loudly with many gestures. Rabbi Hanokh was praying loudly when Rabbi Bunam entered the synagogue. Immediately, Rabbi Hanokh grew quiet, then he told himself that he should be concerned about God, not about Rabbi Bunam, so he began to pray loudly again. After Rabbi Hanokh’s loud prayer, Rabbi Bunam told him that the prayer especially pleased him.

• Comedian George Burns was not an observant Jew as an adult because of something that happened when he was a child. His grandmother died, and his family needed to have a minyan — a group of 10 Jews to pray and hold services. Unfortunately, his family was able to get only seven Jews — so they had to pay three other Jews to pray in the minyan. Mr. Burns says, “That stuck with me all my life. I couldn’t imagine anyone getting paid for praying.”

• In 1933, an earthquake struck Los Angeles. Two members of the New York Giants organization — manager Bill Terry and club secretary Jim Tierney — were rooming together. When the quake struck, Mr. Tierney, a devout Catholic, knelt and prayed. Mr. Terry, who was not a devout Catholic, also knelt, saying, “I don’t know what you’re saying, Tierney, but it goes for me, too.”

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

250 Anecdotes About Religion — Buy

250 Anecdotes About Religion — Buy the Paperback

250 Anecdotes About Religion — Kindle

250 Anecdotes About Religion — Apple

250 Anecdotes About Religion — Barnes and Noble

250 Anecdotes About Religion — Kobo

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