David Bruce: The Funniest People in Art — Collectors, Comics, Cartoons, Crime

From Bruce Anecdotes

Collectors

• A rich American wanted to buy a Rembrandt, but he owned no other paintings. Lord Duveen refused to sell it to him, saying, “I can’t possibly sell a Rembrandt to a man who owns no other pictures. The Rembrandt would be lonely.”

• Even after Impressionist painter Edgar Degas’ eyesight grew bad in his old age, he still collected works of art. One day he bought a painting at an auction, then asked a friend, “Is it beautiful?”

Comics

• Did you know that the comic book heroine Wonder Woman was created for the purpose of serving as feminist propaganda? It’s true. William Moulton Marston — the man who invented the technological basis of the lie detector — created Wonder Woman in the 1940s. He explained, “Wonder Woman is psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who should, I believe, rule the world. There isn’t love enough in the male organism to rule this planet peacefully. … I have given Wonder Woman this dominant force but have kept her loving, tender, maternal, and feminine in every other way.” In other words, according to her creator, the purpose of Wonder Woman is to help brainwash young male comic book readers into allowing women to rule them.

• Al Capp for many years wrote and drew the comic strip Li’l Abner. At a cocktail party, his hostess introduced him to a VIP. She said, “Mr. President, I’d like you to meet the famous comic strip cartoonist Al Capp.” The President asked, “What comic strip?” After answering the President’s question, the hostess then said, “Mr. Capp, I’d like to introduce the President.” Mr. Capp asked, “What country?”

• One of the things that Stan Lee did to make Marvel comic books interesting to the reader was to write entertaining credits for the stories. For example, “Written with Passion by Stan Lee. Drawn with Pride by Jack Kirby. Inked with Perfection by Joe Sinnott. And Lettered with a Scratchy Pen by Artie Simek.”

Costumes

• When George Balanchine’s Four Temperaments was premiered at Ballet Society’s premier performance (a doubly historic event), everything was a smash success — except for the costumes, which had been designed by artist Kurt Seligmann, who neglected to design costumes that did not obscure the dancing. Mr. Balanchine was aware of the problem, and after the premiere, he asked Mr. Seligmann, “Can’t we modify and cut away fabric? Costumes are blocking choreography. No one can see steps.” Unfortunately, Mr. Seligmann objected, “If we cut fabric and change costumes, yes, we will see choreography, but then no one will see the designs. No one will see Seligmann!” For a while, at least, the costumes stayed.

• When artist Marc Chagall designed the costumes for ballerina Alicia Markova’s performance in Léonide Massine’s Aleko, he occasionally sent notes to Ms. Markova. He once drew a heart, then signed his name inside it — and he told Ms. Markova that he was sending his heart to her.

Crime

• On April 22, 1911, the security guards of the Louvre Museum were busy, and someone stole the Mona Lisa by simply walking out the door with it. For two years, it was missing, until finally the thief contacted Alfredo Geri, a Florentine art dealer. Mr. Geri in turn contacted the police, and they recovered the famous painting, which had been stolen by a house painter named Vincenzo Peruggia. He had worked at the Louvre, and he had stolen the Mona Lisa because he felt that its true home was in Italy. The Mona Lisa was returned to the Louvre, where it can be seen today.

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Art — Christmas, Clothing, Collectors

Christmas

• Political cartoonist Thomas Nast was also famous for his drawings of Christmas and of Santa Claus, and he was responsible for many of the ideas we associate with Santa Claus — the red and white suit of clothing, the workshop at the North Pole, and the reading by Santa Claus of letters sent to him by children. In a drawing titled Christmas Flirtation, Mr. Nast drew Julia, his daughter, standing under some mistletoe. In England, boys followed the custom of kissing a girl, then removing a berry from the mistletoe. Once the berries were gone, the boys no longer were allowed to kiss the girl. The mistletoe that Julia is standing underneath is heavily laden with berries.

• In the comic strip Peanuts, Lucy sometimes dispensed psychiatric help in a booth for 5 cents. One winter Benjamin Weininger, a psychiatrist at the Southern California Counseling Center in Los Angeles, followed her example. He sat in a lemonade stand bearing the sign, “In the Xmas Spirit … Counseling 5 cents.” However, Charles Schultz, the creator of Peanuts, pointed out that the sign was not entirely correct — when it’s cold, Lucy raises her price to 7 cents.

Clothing

• Early in her career, photographer Margaret Bourke-White had little money to spend on clothing. Her professional clothing consisted of one grey suit, with red accessories and blue accessories. She alternated the use of the red accessories and the blue accessories, and she kept notes of what she was wearing when she met with customers. If she had worn the red accessories the last time she had met a particular customer, she made sure to wear the blue accessories the next time she met that particular customer.

• Gertrude Stein was able to buy paintings by Picasso and other famous artists early in their careers partly because she economized on clothing. In a conversation with Ernest Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley, she advised Hadley to buy clothes for durability and not for style, and to buy paintings with the money thus saved. During the conversation, Hadley had a difficult time refraining from looking at Ms. Stein’s eccentric and decidedly unfashionable clothing.

• Mexican artist Diego Rivera knew what was important in life. While he was living in Paris, a fire broke out in his apartment one night as he was sleeping. Mr. Rivera ran around, gathering paintings and taking them outside to safety. Only after he had saved several paintings did he discover that he wasn’t wearing any pants.

Collectors

• A man who had become rich through cheating the customers who shopped at his chain of stores spent millions to acquire works of art that he hung on his walls and gloated over. He often invited people to his mansion and asked them to point out anything that was not refined, but no one ever did. One day, the rich man invited a Buddhist monk to view his art collection. The monk said, “Your art collection is really exquisite and refined, but one thing is not in harmony with it.” Surprised, the rich man asked, “What is that?” The monk replied, “You.”

• An Australian artist knew that soprano Frances Alda collected art, so he booked passage on a ship he knew she was sailing on, and he set up an exhibition in the ship’s lounge. The captain of the ship invited her to the art exhibition, but unfortunately for the artist Ms. Alda was knowledgeable about art. She entered the ship’s lounge, glanced at the paintings on display — then uttered “Good God!” and walked out.

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Art — Children

Children

• When Stan Berenstain, co-creator with Jan, his wife, of the Berenstain Bears books, was a small child, he went into a room that had been newly wallpapered. Even at his young age, he knew that he enjoyed drawing, and facing a wall in desperate need of decorating and armed with a red crayon in his hand, he went to work. Unfortunately, the adults in the house were not appreciative of his decorating efforts, and since it was a time that not only allowed but also encouraged spanking, he ended up suffering for his art.

• After publishing his children’s book And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, Dr. Seuss presented a program for 300 third-graders at Higbee’s Department Store in Cleveland, Ohio. As part of the presentation, he drew several pictures. Unfortunately, the children did not respond to the drawings. Dr. Seuss asked, “Don’t you like my drawing?” The children honestly replied, “No — Gus can draw better.” Dr. Seuss invited Gus onto the stage to draw a picture — and yes, Gus did draw better than Dr. Seuss.

• Ezra Jack Keats once created a children’s picture-book titled Pet Show! about a child who took a germ to enter in a pet show. Tori Bond of Shaker Heights, Ohio, read the book, and she decided to enter a pet show in which no cats or dogs were allowed. (Her “real” pet was a cat.) Therefore, she coughed in a jar and named her pet germ Ralph. In a letter to Mr. Keats, she wrote, “I won first prize for most unusual pet. A doctor told me that Ralph eats cells.”

• Navaho artist R.C. “Rudy” Gorman was born prematurely. Because he was small and weak, his physician put him in an incubator to keep him warm and help him grow stronger. However, when his great-grandmother, a full-blooded Navajo, saw him in the incubator, she screamed, “Those crazy white people are killing your child!” She took Rudy away, fed him milk mixed with coffee, and soon the future artist grew big and strong without the incubator.

• When photographer Margaret Bourke-White was a little girl, she decided to attract some attention at her school, so she wrapped two pet snakes around her arms and took the snakes to school. The snakes created quite a sensation, especially a harmless puff adder that puffed out its neck and hissed at the children. Young Margaret had fun, but the principal told her not to bring snakes to school anymore.

• German artist Käthe Kollwitz once drew a portrait of herself and Peter, her seven-year-old son. The pose necessitated that she hold her son while drawing with one hand for long periods of time. This sometimes made her groan, but Peter would tell her, “Don’t worry, Mother. It will be beautiful.” In fact, the finished work of art is beautiful.

• Renaissance painter Giotto di Bondone created beautiful works of art, but he was ugly and his children were ugly. When Dante, author of The Divine Comedy, asked about this paradox, Giotto replied that his children were produced in the dark of night while his works of art were created in the light of day.

• One of American Impressionist Mary Cassatt’s young nephews grew tired of posing for her, so he spat in her face. The boy’s mother punished him by locking him in a closet, but Ms. Cassatt bought him some chocolates.

• Trevor Mark Sage-EL has a white mother and a black father. He is very creative, and when his teacher asked him to draw a self-portrait at school, he drew a yin-yang symbol, which is half-black and half-white.

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Art — Cartoons, Censorship, Children

Cartoons

• Garry Trudeau first started publishing a cartoon titled Bull Tales in the Yale Record, a magazine at Yale University. He then showed samples of the cartoon to Reed Hundt, editor of the Yale Daily News, the campus newspaper. Mr. Hundt looked over the sample cartoons, then said, “They’re all right. We publish pretty much anything.” Later, Bull Tales became better known as Doonesbury.

Censorship

• Marty Links drew the comic strip Emmy Lou for 34 years, but she ended it in 1979 because her syndicate would not allow her to have her characters discuss controversies such as the Vietnam War, which her own three children — who were teenagers like Emmy Lou — were discussing. In 1970, she wanted to introduce a black character, but her syndicate forbade her to because Southern newspapers would not run the strip.

• At the beginning of the 20th century, political cartoonists made fun of a governor of Pennsylvania by drawing his likeness in the form of a fat parrot, so the governor helped pass a law that made it illegal for artists to depict human beings as birds or animals. The cartoonists responded by drawing the governor’s likeness in the form of a fat vegetable.

• A visitor to the studio of painter James McNeill Whistler saw a nude painting hanging on the wall and asked, “Isn’t that indecent?” Mr. Whistler replied, “No, madam, but your question is.”

Children

• As a child, American realist painter Andrew Wyeth was a little rascal. One day, while riding in the back seat of the family car, Andrew threw some firecrackers — which he had lit — under the front seat. He also once hid behind a curtain near the christening font in church. While the minister gave his sermon, Andrew made faces at the congregation. In addition, he once wanted to shoplift a candy bar, so he tried to make a little girl be his lookout. She didn’t want to do it, so he put the candy bar in one of her pockets, then laughed as he ran away. Perhaps not surprisingly, young Andrew’s hands were never still. When his father, the eminent illustrator N.C. Wyeth, tried to paint young Andrew’s portrait in Andy with Fire Engine, he was forced to leave the hands unfinished.

• Bill Peet has written and illustrated many picture-books for children, such as Big Bad Bruce and Hubert’s Hair-Raising Adventure, but for a while he wanted to create high-brow paintings. After working at Disney for years, he started a painting, but was disappointed with the results. The painting seemed to him to be “dull and uninspired,” and soon he lost interest in it. However, Billy, his very young son, liked to paint, and while his father was away, Billy worked on the painting. At first, Mr. Peet’s wife, Margaret, was worried that he would be angry, but in fact he was relieved that he didn’t have to finish the painting. Soon afterward, he discovered his true calling and started to create the children’s picture-books for which he became famous.

• As a child, Jerry Butler used a stick to draw in the red dirt in his yard in Magnolia, Mississippi. Often his drawings went unnoticed, but when he drew a picture of his relatives, his grandmother Artise (whom he called Grand Mo Lu) called for everyone to come and look at what he had created. Afterward, whenever someone would ask the kids in the family what they wanted to be when they grew up and young Jerry would answer that he wanted to be an FBI agent or something like that, Grand Mo Lu would tell him, “You’re already an artist. That’s enough to be.” When he grew up, Mr. Butler did become a professional artist — and a writer, too — and he created such books as A Drawing in the Sand: A Story of African American Art.

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Art — Architects, Caricatures, Cartoons

Architects

• Thomas Jefferson designed his home, Monticello. Looked at from the outside, Monticello appeared to have one story (with a domed room above), but that is an illusion consciously created by Mr. Jefferson. On the second story, the windows are close to the floor, while on the first story the windows are close to the ceiling. Looked at from the outside, the windows appear to be providing light to one story. Mr. Jefferson based this design on windows he had admired while in France.

• Architect Frank Lloyd Wright once created a house for a cousin named Richard Lloyd Jones. Unfortunately, after being built, the house leaked when it rained. Mr. Jones’ wife, Georgia, joked, “That’s what happens when you leave a work of art out in the rain.”

Art

• In 1955, Marcia Brown’s book Cinderella won the Caldecott Medal. Charles Scribner’s Sons published it, although Viking Press might have published it if it weren’t for a strike by elevator operators in the 1940s. After Ms. Brown had completed her first picture-book, The Little Carousel, she decided to take it to various publishers to see if they wanted it. Her first choice was Viking Press, but their offices were on the seventh floor, and she didn’t want to climb that many steps. Since the offices of Charles Scribner’s Sons were on the fourth floor, she stopped there first. They were interested in The Little Carousel, they published it, and they continued to publish books by her.

• When Alison Bechdel, creator of Dykes to Watch Out For, first created the character of Mo, she based the character on herself — “a young, white, middle-class, marginally employed lesbian-feminist.” However, she attempted to disguise this fact by drawing Mo with glasses and with hair longer than her own. The attempt was unsuccessful — her friends easily see her in the character and laugh when she tells them about the disguise.

Caricatures

• One of the ways that comedian Whoopi Goldberg knew that she was beginning to make it big was that caricaturist Harry Hirschfeld worked his art on her in The New York Times while she was appearing on a one-woman show on Broadway. Mr. Hirschfeld traditionally hides his daughter’s name — Nina — in his caricatures, and in his caricature of Ms. Goldberg he wrote “Nina” 40 times. Ms. Goldberg was so pleased with Mr. Hirschfeld’s caricature that she sent him flowers.

• Enrico Caruso was a caricaturist as well as a gifted opera singer. In addition, Mr. Caruso was a genuinely likeable human being. The composer Victor Herbert was a big man, and he said of Mr. Caruso, “Even in his caricatures he shows the sweetness of his nature. He has never drawn me as fat as others have.”

• Zero Mostel was funny both on- and offstage. When caricaturist Sam Norkin arrived at a rehearsal to sketch Mr. Mostel and co-star Eli Wallach for an illustration of Eugène Ionesco’s Rhinoceros, Mr. Mostel took him aside and said, “Here’s $20. Leave Eli out of the drawing.”

Cartoons

• Jennifer Camper’s cartoon subGURLZ features three lesbians: 1) Swizzle, who is the strongest woman on Earth. She works in a bar, and when sexually harassed by men, attempts to push them away without hurting them, but tends to accidentally break their necks. 2) Liver, who is on a constant diet of alcohol, tobacco, legal and illegal drugs, and even drain-unplugging products in an attempt to balance the chemicals in her body. She also has the power to bring the recently deceased back to life. 3) Byte, who is so intelligent that hair doesn’t grow on her head. Her hobby is breaking into computer databases and moving funds from the accounts of greedy corporations to the accounts of people who need the money to do such things as go to college. If you ask Ms. Camper whether these subGURLZ are good or evil, she replies, “It depends. Whose side are you on?”

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Art — Animals, Architects

Animals

• Navajo artist R.C. Gorman used to keep several pets, including a de-scented skunk, several iguanas, and a pig at his art gallery. However, the skunk and iguanas frightened his models, so he gave these pets to the Albuquerque Zoo. Unfortunately, his pet pig disappeared under suspicious circumstances shortly before a pig barbeque was held near his art gallery.

• To illustrate his Caldecott Medal-winning picture-book, Make Way for Ducklings, Robert McCloskey needed to know what the underside of a duck’s bill looked like in flight. Therefore, Mr. McCloskey brought a live duck home, wrapped it in a towel, and put it on a couch in such a way that its head stuck out. Mr. McCloskey then lay underneath the duck’s head and sketched what he saw.

• Buick, the pet dog of friends of children’s book illustrator Tim Lewis, loved cows, and whenever the friends were driving in the country, if someone mentioned the word “cow,” Buick would tear around, going from window to window until he sighted the cow. This was hazardous, so eventually the family started spelling the word “cow” when they drove in the country with Buick.

• Like many creative people, Theodor Geisel, who is better known as Dr. Seuss, went through an impoverished period early in life. He and a friend once rented a rat-infested apartment in Greenwich Village. They used canes to drive the rats away from their apartment before going to bed so the rats would not bother them while they were asleep.

• When he was a small boy, Quaker artist Benjamin West made brushes out of hairs from his family’s pet cat, but he had to stop doing this after his father noticed that the cat looked as if it had been severely attacked by moths.

• In New York City, comedian Bob Smith worked as a cater-waiter for a woman who introduced her dogs to him by saying, “This is Picasso, and this is Gorky — the painter, not the writer.”

Architects

• After the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, which destroyed most of the city, architect Julia Morgan was hired to rebuild the Fairmont Hotel, in part because of her expertise in reinforced concrete, which was at that time a new material. Women architects were rare, so a woman reporter inspected the Fairmont Hotel, then asked the foreman, “Is the building really in the charge of a woman architect?” The foreman replied, “This building is in [the] charge of a real architect, and her name happens to be Julia Morgan.” After the building was completed, another woman reporter came to see it. Standing in the dining room, which was decorated with gold, gray, ivory, and scarlet, she said to Ms. Morgan, “How you must have reveled in this chance to squeeze dry the loveliest tubes in the whole world of color!” Ms. Morgan replied, “I don’t think you understand just what my work here has been. The decorative part was done by a New York firm. My work has all been structural.”

• Famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed architecture as works of art, but he also was capable of being very practical. He invented toilets that hung from the wall and stall partitions that hung from the ceiling to make mopping easier. In addition, when he designed the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, Japan, he was aware of the risk of earthquakes and fires resulting from them, so he designed a courtyard pool to serve both as an aesthetic element and as a source of water to fight fires following an earthquake that cut off the usual water supply. After it was completed, the Imperial Hotel survived with little damage a devastating earthquake shortly, and the courtyard pool provided water to fight the fires that sprang up after the earthquake.

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Art — Advertising, AIDS

Advertising

• Surrealist artist Salvador Dali was outrageous. He once greeted reporters while waving a loaf of bread — which was eight feet long — over his head. He also once wore a tuxedo to a public event — a close look at the tuxedo revealed numerous artificial flies pinned to it. Another time, he arrived in a Rolls-Royce for the opening of an exhibition — the car was filled with cauliflowers. In 1936, he began to give a talk while dressed in an airtight underwater diving suit. Unfortunately, this stunt nearly resulted in his death. He wasn’t able to breathe, and it took his audience some time to figure out what was wrong and get his diving helmet off. What kind of art did such a man create? An old Cadillac forms part of a work of art called Rainy Taxi — put a coin in a slot and rain falls inside the Cadillac.

• R. Crumb’s “Keep on Truckin’” drawing became omnipresent during the late 1960s and early 1970s. As so often happens, business later tried to co-opt what was once considered avant garde and controversial. Toyota wished to pay Mr. Crumb lots of money so it could use the drawing and its characters in advertisements for its vehicles. However, Mr. Crumb was unwilling to let Toyota use that particular drawing, suggesting instead that it use a drawing of a headless woman being stuffed into the trunk of a Toyota. Unfortunately, Toyota disliked that idea.

• A marble cutter once took advantage of an unusual opportunity for an advertisement. On his deceased wife’s grave monument, he carved, “Here lies Jane Smith, wife of Thomas Smith, marble cutter. This monument was erected by her husband as a tribute to her memory and a specimen of his work. Monuments of the same style 350 dollars.”

• Dr. Seuss always said that he couldn’t draw, and therefore his drawings were always filled with “exaggerated mistakes.” While working as a commercial artist creating drawings for advertisements, he drew a goat that an ad representative thought was a duck. Dr. Seuss then drew a duck — the ad representative thought it was a goat.

AIDS

• The very first panel in the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt commemorated Marvin Feldman, whose best friend was Cleve Jones, founder of the Names Project. Mr. Jones was despondent following the death of Mr. Feldman. One afternoon he and a friend were in a garage talking about the friends they had lost to AIDS, and as they talked they painted names and designs upon some fabric. This was therapeutic, so Mr. Jones invited other people to help create a quilt of panels commemorating people who had died of AIDS. Today, the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt is the largest collectively created work of art in the world.

• While studying at the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan, Keith Haring used to create art on long lengths of paper — the paper was so long that he rolled it out the door and onto the city sidewalk. Passersby used to talk to him about his art. Mr. Haring later said, “Most of them weren’t the type to go to art galleries, but a lot of their comments struck me as more perceptive than those of my teachers and fellow students.” In 1990, Mr. Haring died of AIDS.

Animals

• Rosebud, the pet cat of children’s book author (and artist) Tom Wharton, enjoyed a good book. She liked to sit on whatever book Mr. Wharton was reading, so after a while, Mr. Wharton started giving her books of her own to sit on — Moby Dick, Puss in Boots, etc. For a couple of years, she sat happily on Gone With the Wind as Mr. Wharton read another book. Being a cat, she is a slow reader. Mr. Wharton turns the page for her only every couple of days.

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Art — Activism, Advertising

Activism

• In 2006, South Dakota instituted almost a total ban on abortions. Bill Napoli, a South Dakota State Senator, supported this ban, saying that women should not be allowed to have abortions even if they get pregnant for “simple rape.” (He did say that he would make an exception for a religious virgin who gets pregnant from a brutalizing rape.) Cartoonist Stephanie McMillan saw Mr. Napoli’s words as expressing a belief that women shouldn’t be allowed to make decisions for themselves, so she created a cartoon in which a woman character telephones Mr. Napoli when she is asked to make a decision about which salad dressing to use — the character asks Mr. Napoli, “Roasted pepper vinaigrette or honey mustard?” The cartoon included Mr. Napoli’s work and home telephone numbers, which many other women used to call him. One woman asked him whether her bra and panties should match; another woman asked him whether she should use tampons or pads.

• Fashion maven Sunny Chapman used to go to abortion clinics to protest — as a member of Satanists 4 Life — along with fellow activists Karen Elliott and Monika LaVey. At their demon-strations they wore devil horns and devil costumes and held signs saying such things as “DON’T ABORT YOUR FETUS — IT COULD BE THE ANTI-CHRIST” and “PRO-LIFE IS PRO-SATAN.” This usually made ordinary pro-life protesters uncomfortable enough to leave the immediate vicinity.

• New York City’s Guerrilla Girls use posters to protest art exhibits dominated by male artists. One poster asked, “When Racism & Sexism Are No Longer Fashionable, What Will Your Art Collection Be Worth?” True artists, the Guerilla Girls dress up in gorilla masks to gain publicity for their cause.

• Absolut Vodka once asked lesbian cartoonist Kris Kovick to draw a cartoon to be used in its ads. She drew a cartoon for “Absolut Hurl,” which depicted a woman vomiting while holding a vodka bottle. Not surprisingly, Absolut Vodka decided not to use the cartoon in its ads.

Advertising

• In many ways, Theodor Geisel, who is better known as Dr. Seuss, was a lucky man. In the 1920s, he created a cartoon for the humor magazine Judge. The cartoon showed a knight in armor lying in bed while a ferocious dragon hovered above him. The caption of the cartoon has the knight referring to a then-common insecticide called Flit: “Darn it all, another Dragon. And just after I’d sprayed the entire castle with Flit!” This cartoon resulted in a contract for Mr. Geisel to create advertisements for Flit because Grace Cleaves saw the cartoon at a hairdresser’s shop, liked it, and convinced her husband, a Flit advertising executive, to hire Mr. Geisel. How lucky was Mr. Geisel? When creating the cartoon, he could have used two insecticides: Flit or Fly Tox. He flipped a coin to decide which to use, and Flit won. In addition, Mrs. Cleaves’ regular hairdresser’s shop did not have Judge. Because her regular hairdresser’s shop was busy, she went to another hairdresser’s shop, where she saw the issue of Judge that contained Mr. Geisel’s cartoon.

• In 1934, artist Salvador Dali designed a window that featured nude mannequins for New York department store Bonwit Teller. Of course, the professional window dressers preferred mannequins wearing the clothing that the store sold, so when Mr. Dali left they put clothing on the mannequins. When Mr. Dali returned and saw the alterations to his window display, he made a major display of temperament, including throwing a bathtub used in the display through a plate-glass store window so that the bathtub made an unscheduled stop on the Fifth Avenue sidewalk. Shortly afterward, Mr. Dali made an unscheduled stop in jail. According to world-famous window dresser Simon Doonan, this situation was win-win for everybody. Mr. Dali further increased his reputation as an eccentric art genius and the store received lots of fabulous free publicity.

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