David Bruce: The Funniest People in Relationships — Children

Children

• Impressionist painter Edgar Degas loved children. A mother once criticized her daughter for making spelling mistakes, then she asked Mr. Degas, “It’s very bad to misspell, is it not, Monsieur Degas?” He agreed, but when the mother’s back was turned, he asked the child, “Which would you prefer — to spell correctly and not have ice cream or to make mistakes and have ice cream?” The child replied, “To make mistakes and have ice cream.” Mr. Degas agreed, “So would I.”

• When Julie Krone was two years old, a woman came to her family’s farm to look at a horse she was thinking about buying. To show that the horse was gentle, her mother lifted young Julie up and put her on the back of the horse, then she started talking to the woman. As she was talking, the horse trotted off. Her mother was understandably worried, but young Julie grabbed the reins and turned the horse around. As an adult, Ms. Krone became a famous jockey.

• When Jamie Tevis, wife of Walter Tevis (author of the novels The Hustler, The Color of Money, and The Man Who Fell to Earth) was about to give birth to their first child, Will, the pain of the contractions made her say, “I can’t go through with this.” Her husband replied, “It’s too late to think about that now.” When Will became a toddler, a favorite activity was hearing his mother sneeze. This made him laugh so hard that he would fall down.

• As a kid growing up in the 1950s, Newbery Award-winning author Jerry Spinelli sometimes attended movies in the park. According to tradition, teenagers sat on the benches while young kids such as Jerry sat on the ground. One evening, Jerry decided to sit on a bench. This went well until some teenagers decided that they wanted to sit on the bench. They lifted one end of the bench into the air — and Jerry slid off the other end.

• Children’s book author Joanna Cole uses in her books things that have happened in her family. For example, in one book, a child finds a “rock” that is actually a piece of Styrofoam covered with dirt. In real life, Joanna’s daughter, Rachel, was so excited to discover such a “rock” at the park that she had told Joanna, “Mommy, Mommy, look at this terrific rock.” Joanna couldn’t bring herself to tell Rachel that it wasn’t a rock.

• Susan Butcher grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, but she disliked the noise, confusion, and lack of open space. When she was in the first grade, she even wrote a paper with the title “I Hate Cities.” (The title was also the entire paper.) She also asked her parents to allow her to live in a tent in their yard. As an adult, she moved to Alaska, where she won the 1,049-mile Iditarod dog sled race multiple times.

• During Canadian winters, Canadian schoolchildren wear snowsuits. A kindergarten teacher once dressed one of her students in a snowsuit that was loaded with buttons and zippers, so he could go outside for recess. After she dressed him, he told her, “This isn’t my snowsuit,” so she undressed him again. After she had undressed the boy, he told her, “This snowsuit’s my sister’s, but my mom said I could wear it today.”

• Even in her youth, opera singer Geraldine Farrar exhibited assertiveness. Clarence, a 12- or 13-year-old boy who was older than she, tripped her with his hockey stick. Although she told him to stop, he continued. After he had tripped her three times, she removed three metal ribs from her umbrella, then taught him a lesson that resulted in his being unable to sit down without pain for a few days.

• Children’s author Eve Bunting was born in an old Irish house that her father and grandfather had also been born in. Before it was a house, it had been a granary, and because the house was so old, it sometimes settled, sending a shower of seeds down from the ceiling onto the residents. Young Eve thought that ghosts were playing tricks on her family, so she would look upward and yell, “You up there! Stop that!”

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Relationships — Children

Children

• When her children were old enough to go to school, Eve Bunting started to write books in a room in the attic. When she wanted to write, she warned her children not to interrupt her unless it was an emergency. Despite the warning, she was frequently interrupted. A child would appear at the bottom of the stairs and yell up at her, “It’s an emergency! I can’t find my shoes!” One day, one of her children yelled, “It’s a true emergency! Come see the drawing I did! It’s really good!” Despite the interruptions, Ms. Bunting managed to write and have published The Two Giants — and 100 other books for children.

• When children’s book author Tomie dePaola was growing up, his mother brushed her hair and put on her makeup while sitting in front of a vanity, which made her feel a little silly because, as she pointed out, she was not a movie star. However, her little boy, Tomie, did want to look like a movie star, so one day he sat in front of the vanity and put on his mother’s lipstick, trying to look like his favorite movie star: Mae West. When he tried to remove the lipstick, he couldn’t, so his family found out what he had done. For a few days, little Tomie ran around the neighborhood with brightly colored lips.

• Opera singer Leo Slezak used to take his children to an amusement park where they would hit Punchy Monkey — a large robot with a well-padded face — on the jaw. Punchy Monkey would growl when you hit him, the volume of the growl depending on the intensity with which you hit him. Often, Mr. Slezak played Punchy Monkey with his children at home, letting them hit him gently, then growling. One morning, Mr. Slezak was still asleep when his very young daughter walked into his bedroom and hit him in the face. When he woke up angry, she explained, “I thought you were playing Punchy Monkey.”

• As a child, Benjamin West made his own paint brushes, using hairs from the tail of the family cat. Unfortunately, Benjamin liked to paint, and soon the cat’s tail had bald places. A visitor from Philadelphia saw Benjamin’s works of art and was so impressed that he gave him some paints and brushes. Because Benjamin enjoyed painting so much, he played hooky from school and instead went into the attic to paint. His parents had no idea he was playing hooky until his teacher paid a visit to find out where Benjamin had been for the last several school days.

• Bonnie Blair’s family were speed skaters. In fact, when Bonnie was born, her father and siblings were at the ice rink doing exactly that. Bonnie’s birth was even announced over the ice rink loudspeaker in this way: “Another speed skater has been born to the Blair family.” The announcement was true. When Bonnie was two years old, she started skating — her siblings acquired the smallest pair of skates they could find and slipped them over Bonnie’s regular shoes. As an Olympic speed skater, Bonnie won five gold medals.

• R.L. Stine, author of the Fear Street and Goosebumps series, used to listen to the beginning of the Suspenseradio show when he was a child. The show opened with a gong being struck, then a scary voice said, with appropriate pauses, “And now … tales … calculated … to keep you … in suspense.” The opening of the show was so scary that young Bob used to turn off the radio and not listen to the rest of the show. As an adult, Mr. Stine says, “Today, I try to make my books as scary as that announcer’s voice.”

• In kindergarten, future author Frank DeCaro met a little girl named Heidi who loved to play a joke on her friends. She would say, “Let’s see who can hit the lightest.” After her friend had lightly tapped her arm, she would hit him as hard as she could, then laugh and say, “I lose.” In the first grade, Frank went to the hospital to have his tonsils removed, so Heidi wrote him this note: “I like you and you like me. I will buy you a toy.” According to Mr. DeCaro, “At six, that was my idea of love.”

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Relationships — Children

Children

• Christina Aguilera became famous at a very young age after coming in second on a nationally televised episode of Star Search, being a member of the Disney TV series Mickey Mouse Club, and singing the song “Reflection” in the Disney animated movie Mulan. Unfortunately, her schoolmates were jealous of her success. After her second-place finish on Star Search, someone slashed the tires on her mother’s car. Immediately, young Christina transferred to another school. In addition, after newspapers began to print articles about her after she joined the Mickey Mouse Club, her new schoolmates resented her success. Fortunately, the resentment of schoolmates was countered by the love of her fans, who started writing her letters, all of which she attempted to answer. After her debut album, Christina Aguilera, became a huge success, some young fans who had just bought her record recognized her and bought a disposable camera so they could take her photograph. This kind of attention didn’t bother Christina. She said, “I know some people hate that, but not me. I’ve been waiting for this moment for my entire life.”

• Matthew Dunn is the son of David Dunn, who is English, Scottish, and Irish Canadian, and of Morningstar Mercredi, who is Métis (a mixture of French and Native American), Denedeh (a Native American tribe also known as Chipewyan), and Cree (another Native American tribe). When Matthew was three years old, his parents divorced, but they found a unique way for both of them to keep Matthew in their lives. He spends one year with his father in Watrous, Saskatchewan, Canada, then he spends the following year with his mother in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. By spending alternate years with each parent, Matthew can remain close to each of them. A disadvantage of the arrangement is that Matthew changes schools each year, but an advantage is that he can travel and learn about the cultures of which he is a part. By the way, Matthew has an additional name, courtesy of his Native American heritage. When he was 10 years old, he received the name Sus Nakáhdul in a naming ceremony. His Native American name means “Bear Walker.”

• Nancy and Rip Talavera used to receive telephone calls each night from the woman who lived in the apartment underneath theirs; she wanted them to tell their daughter to stop jumping in bed so loudly. Nancy and Rip would then check on their daughters. Four-year-old Coral would be sound asleep in her bed, but one-and-a-half-year-old Tracee was jumping in her crib. As you would expect, Tracee grew up to be a gymnast. When she was still very young, she took an acrobatics class and performed in a show while wearing a Mickey Mouse mask. Unfortunately, the mask moved, and she was unable to see out of the eyeholes. She still did the tricks, but she smashed into the back wall, bending one mouse ear. In 1984, Tracee won a silver team medal at the Olympic Games.

• Ezra Jack Keats, author/illustrator of such children’s books as The Snowy Day and The Little Drummer Boy, drew everything he came across when he was a child. One day, he decorated his family’s kitchen table with drawings of houses and people. His mother walked into the kitchen, and although he expected to be bawled out for his artwork, she told him, “Did you do that? Isn’t it wonderful!” His father, however, worried that being an artist would be a difficult way to make a living, so he wanted his son to do other things, such as play ball. However, when his father realized that Ezra Jack had real talent, he took him on an outing to the Metropolitan Museum in New York City, thus showing that he was proud of his son and his son’s talent for art.

• As a child, Trina Schart Hyman, an illustrator of children’s books, played at being Little Red Riding Hood. Her mother made her a red satin cape with a hood, and whenever little Trina wore the cape and hood, which was almost every day, her mother also made her a basket of goodies. The path to Grandma’s house was in the backyard, her dog was the wolf, and her father was the woodsman who saved Little Red Riding Hood. In her autobiography, Self-Portrait: Trina Schart Hyman, Ms. Hyman wrote, “I was Red Riding Hood for a year or more. I think it’s a great tribute to my mother that she never gave up and took me to a psychiatrist, and if she ever worried, she never let me know.”

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Relationships — Baseball, Birth, Children

Baseball

• On November 5, 1988, the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, opened its “Women in Baseball” display, much of which is devoted to the 1940s/1950s All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Among the women players present for the opening was catcher/outfielder Sarah Jane “Salty” Sands, who brought her 88-year-old father. For more than 30 years, he had boasted about his daughter’s accomplishments in professional baseball. Another player, outfielder Lois “Tommie” Barker even chartered a Greyhound bus to transport her supporters to the display opening.

• Nat King Cole was a baseball fan, and his son, Kelly, was a little jealous of the attention that Mr. King gave to baseball. After a tour that had kept Mr. King away from his family, he returned home, but left almost immediately with his wife to attend a Los Angeles Dodgers baseball game. In the ninth inning, the game was tied, and LA fans were hoping for a Dodger hit to win the game, but Kelly simply wanted to see his father. Listening to the game on the radio, Kelly said, “Come on, anybody, and get a hit so my mommy and daddy can come home.”

• In 1944, Carolyn Morris, a pitcher for the Rockford (Illinois) Peaches team of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, saw some boys playing baseball in a sandlot. She asked if she could take a turn at batting. The boys were agreeable, and Ms. Morris promptly hit a home run. Properly impressed, the boys asked her, “Say, lady, have you got a brother who’d like to play ball with us?”

• Baseball manager Joe McCarthy came home discouraged after his Chicago Cubs were defeated. His wife saw his discouragement and said, “You still have me, Joe.” Mr. McCarthy smiled, then joked, “Yes, but in the ninth inning today I would have traded you for a sacrifice fly.”

• Olympic gold medalist Dot Richardson, a softball shortstop, was discovered when she was a 10-year-old. While she was playing catch with her brother, a man asked her if she wanted to play on his Little League team, telling her, “We’ll cut your hair short and call you Bob.”

Birth

• Dr. Rosalyn S. Yalow, a Noble Prize winner, worked at a Veterans Administration hospital which required pregnant women to stop working during the fifth month of pregnancy; however, Dr. Yalow was so valuable to the hospital that the administrators did not want her to stop working. What to do? Answer: Fudge a few documents. According to the official records of the hospital, Dr. Yalow gave birth during the fifth month of two pregnancies — each “five-months-in-the-womb” baby weighed a remarkable 8 pounds, 2 ounces.

• James McNeill Whistler was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, on July 11, 1834. Lowell was then a new town that was devoted to the manufacture of cloth — it was not a classy town. However, Mr. Whistler had the perfect reply when a society lady asked, “Whatever possessed you to be born in a place like that?” He answered, “The explanation is quite simple — I wished to be near my mother.”

• Jerry Clower knows that his wife, Homerline, loves him. She had just given birth to a girl, and Mr. Clower, a sports fan, told her, “Honey, we got us a little cheerleader.” Homerline, who of course was very tired, looked at him and asked, “Honey, have you had any supper?”

Children

• While growing up in the 1930s, children’s book author Tomie dePaola had two grandmothers and one great-grandmother, all of whom were called Nana. To keep them straight, he referred to Nana Upstairs, because his great-grandmother spent all her time upstairs, and Nana Downstairs, because unless this grandmother was helping Nana Upstairs, she could be found downstairs. There was also Nana Fall River, who lived in Fall River, Massachusetts. Nana Upstairs was 94 years old, and she had to be tied to her chair so that she wouldn’t fall off the chair. Young Tomie wanted to be like Nana Upstairs, so when he visited her, he requested that he be tied to his chair, too. Nana Downstairs honored the request, but she always tied the knot in front so that he could untie himself when he wanted to wander around. While wandering around, Tomie looked for and often found candy in a sewing box. One day, no candy could be found, so he looked in the medicine cabinet, where he found what he thought was chocolate, which he and Nana Upstairs ate. Unfortunately, the “chocolate” was actually a laxative, and he and Nana Upstairs made messes. After that incident, Nana Downstairs always made sure that there was candy in the sewing box.

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Relationships — Animals, Art, Babies

Animals

• While she was in the second grade, children’s book illustrator Lane Smith entered her pet, Okie, in a dog show at school. Surprisingly, Okie was given a ribbon, and Lane’s mother praised Okie and told Lane that everyone was proud of Okie. Lane then looked at the ribbon — it said, “Participation.”

• Children’s book author and illustrator Dr. Seuss read one newspaper each day. For a while, he subscribed to two newspapers, but the family Irish setter, Cluny, was used to bringing only one newspaper into the house, so she buried the second newspaper.

• Children’s book illustrator Maira Kalman is allergic to dogs, so when her children decided that they wanted a dog as a pet, they had to settle for getting a talking bird and teaching it how to bark.

Art

• When American artist Donald Sultan was 11 years old, his parents took him to see the Ringling Museum in Sarasota, Florida. At the circus museum, he saw a work of art titled “The Giant.” His mother told him that she had sat on the giant’s knee when she was a little girl and that his ring was so big that a half-dollar could pass through it. Mr. Sultan says, “It was at that moment that the art and the magic merged and I decided to be an artist myself.”

• Some artists suffer — as do their families. To become an artist, Paul Gauguin gave up a career as a stockbroker. Due to financial difficulties, his wife moved back to her native Denmark. Only occasionally was Mr. Gauguin able to see his children, and when he did, only his two oldest children were able to speak his language: French.

Babies

• As a man of some experience with children, Texas actor Marco Perella knows how to calm babies. One trick he uses is to put the baby’s head against his chest, then to hum “Old Man River” in a deep bass. The vibration mesmerizes the baby, making it quiet. While he was doing a TV movie scene for Murder in the Heartland with Renée Zellweger, the baby she was holding started crying. Marco took the baby, hummed “Old Man River” and quieted it, then gave it back to Renée. The baby started crying again. This happened a couple of times, and the director asked what was going on. Renée replied, “This baby hates me.” No problem, the director said, they could use a back-up baby in the scene. Unfortunately, the back-up baby behaved exactly the same way as the first baby. Marco hummed “Old Man River” and quieted the baby, then handed it to Renée, and the baby started crying. Eventually, the scene was filmed with Marco holding the baby, and if you listen carefully during the scene, you can hear the humming of “Old Man River.”

• Early in her career, when soprano Rita Hunter had a young child, a situation arose suddenly where she needed to be at an important rehearsal and her husband needed to be in a hospital. Having no babysitter because they were so new to the neighborhood, but needing one desperately, she gathered her baby’s things, knocked on the door of a neighbor, explained the situation hurriedly, shoved the baby into the neighbor’s arms, and ran off. Luck was with her. She hadn’t left her daughter in the hands of a dangerous person, but in the hands of a most excellent babysitter, whom she thanked by name — Auntie Symes — in her autobiography, Wait Till the Sun Shines, Nellie.

• When Lois Lowry, author of the children’s book Anastasia Krupnik, was seven years old, she wanted a puppy, so her family arranged to have a puppy delivered as a surprise for her when young Lois was alone at their house. When her family returned home, they discovered Lois sitting on a chest of drawers, afraid of the sharp-toothed puppy. Later, Lois grew used to the puppy, but when it bit her baby brother, her parents said that they had to get rid of it. Lois agreed, but she was surprised when her parents got rid of the puppy — she had thought they were going to get rid of her baby brother.

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Relationships — Animals

Animals

• Children’s book author Betsy Byars has always been very interested in animals, including snakes and bugs. When she was a young girl, she waded in a creek. When she came out, she was very interested to find that brown things had attached themselves to her legs and didn’t want to come off, so she went home to show everyone. The brown things were leeches, and her mother was not happy. But despite being forbidden to get leeches on her legs again, Betsy waded in the creek whenever she wanted to collect leeches for a free-admission “zoo” in the backyard.

• In London immediately following World War II, food was scarce. However, one day, Lord Snowy, the pet cat of children’s book illustrator Tony Ross’s Uncle Barry, came to the rescue. Lord Snowy played on the balcony for a while one day, then dragged a steak into the apartment. Uncle Barry took the steak from Lord Snowy, washed it, and in an exhaustive taste test discovered that it was delicious. Where did the steak come from? No idea. Unfortunately, although Uncle Barry continued to let Lord Snowy play on the balcony, the cat brought no more steaks home.

• Lee Brewster owned and managed Lee’s Mardi Gras, a store for cross-dressers (mainly men who dress like women) in New York. He had a beloved house cat named Kitty Cat, and when he had to take his beloved cat to a pet hospital for emergency treatment, he was outraged because the staff placed money before comfort. After Kitty Cat had been treated, the staff would not allow Mr. Brewster to see his beloved cat until he had paid the bill. Mr. Brewster threw his platinum American Express card down and shouted, “Kitty Cat is no pauper!”

• When Paula Klein-Bruno was a kid, she knew that she wanted to be a jockey. She even bought a jockey cap and wore it all the time — the only way that her mother could get it away from her long enough to clean it was to take it to a one-hour dry cleaner. In 1995, Ms. Klein-Bruno achieved her dream, riding as a jockey in the New York racing circuit. (As a toddler, whenever she saw horse vans on the roads, she would yell, “Horses! Horses!” And as a kid, she often prayed, “God, please don’t let me grow too tall.” He didn’t — she is 4’11”.)

• Music director Theodore Stier was with dancer Anna Pavlova as she walked her dog, whose name was Teddy, in Montgomery, Alabama. A man saw them and was greatly impressed with Teddy and asked Mr. Stier if the woman wanted to sell him; however, Ms. Pavlova didn’t want to sell such a beloved pet. Therefore, Mr. Stier, Ms. Pavlova, and Teddy continued their walk, only to have the dog-lover suddenly yell to Mr. Stier, “Tell the girl that if only she’ll let me have the dog — I’ll marry her!”

• American author Flannery O’Connor loved birds all her life. When she was five years old, New York newsreel company Pathé News filmed one of her chickens because it was able to walk backwards. Later, in a home economics class, Flannery created what she described as “a piqué coat with a lace collar and two buttons in the back” for another of her chickens. As an adult, Ms. O’Connor raised peacocks.

• Sir Arthur Sullivan, a conductor, once heard that the young son of soprano Emma Albani was ill. He visited and had tea with Ms. Albani and her young son, who had nearly recovered from his illness. To amuse the boy, Sir Arthur brought a white rabbit, which hopped around the boy’s nursery. Thereafter, Ms. Albani’s son referred to Sir Arthur as “the White Rabbit.”

• Of course, identical triplets are very similar, but they are not so similar that family pets can’t tell them apart. For example, Edgar, the dog owned by the family of a set of identical triplets — who are named Darren, David, and Donny — can tell them apart. Their mother can tell Edgar to fetch David, and Edgar knows immediately whom to fetch.

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

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David Bruce: The Funniest People in Neighborhoods — Work; The Funniest People in Relationships — Activism, Animals

Work

• When she was in the fourth grade, writer Mary E. Lyons was taken on a field trip to a cotton field. She and the other children picked cotton for half an hour, then they were paid a dime. After paying the children, the owner of the cotton field invited the children to visit his country store. Because picking cotton was hard, hot, thirsty work, young Mary spent her dime on a bottle of Coca-Cola. When she grew up and remembered this experience, she realized that the owner of the cotton field and country store had probably paid a nickel for the bottle of Coca-Cola. He had gotten half an hour’s work from young Mary and also made cash money.

• Karen D. Beatty, RN, has this as her motto: “We’ll get there!” For example, she is an African-American, and occasionally while working as a visiting nurse, she will sense that she is not welcome in some homes because of the color of her skin. Of course, if the patient requests a different nurse, she respects their wishes, but she will also tell herself, “We’ll get there!” Even as a little girl, Ms. Beatty wanted to be a nurse because of one of her aunts who was a nurse. In first grade, she was given the assignment to make a paper doll. She made a paper nurse doll that had a brown face.

• Halle Berry was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and she got her first name because her pregnant mother was shopping in Halle Brothers, a department store, and she decided that she liked the store’s name. Before becoming a model and actress, Halle studied broadcast journalism at Cuyahoga Community College. She decided that this profession was not for her after she started crying while interviewing a family who had just lost their house in a fire.

• Duffy and Sweeney (Jimmy Duffy and Fred Sweeney) were an early vaudeville comedy team. Once, they were fired, so Mr. Duffy and a small boy appeared at the office of the guy who had fired them. Mr. Duffy pointed to the boy and said, “Are you going to let him starve?” The comedy team was rehired, and the guy who had hired, fired, and rehired them never learned that the boy was not Mr. Duffy’s son.

Activism

• Anna Rosenberg, who gave President Franklin Delano Roosevelt the idea for the G.I. Bill of Rights, learned the importance of activism early in life. When she was 14, she was a student at Wadleigh High School in New York City, and she and other students were annoyed because they had to attend school in shifts and share desks because of a lack of desks and other proper facilities. Therefore, she and the other students paid a visit to the city aldermen (politicians), who ignored them because they were a bunch of students. The aldermen even started to leave the room the students were in. However, young Anna yelled after the aldermen, “Very well, gentlemen, you may have heard enough, but now you will hear from our parents, who are your constituents.” The aldermen paid attention to the students after that, and Anna told them exactly what the school needed. The next year, each of the students at the school had a desk and attending school in shifts was no longer necessary.

• When African-American poet Nikki Giovanni was a teenager in Knoxville, Tennessee, people gathered together to protest a hate crime. Nikki’s grandmother explained that she and Nikki’s grandfather were too old to march in the protest — so to take their place in the march they had volunteered Nikki.

Animals

• One of the many dogs in author Gary Paulsen’s life was Cookie, the lead dog on his sledding team both in Minnesota and during the 1,049-mile Iditarod Sled Dog Race in Alaska. Cookie arrived in Mr. Paulsen’s life lean and hungry, and during his first two days with Mr. Paulsen, Cookie ate a 75-pound beaver carcass. It’s a good thing Cookie came into Mr. Paulsen’s life. She saved his life at least three times, including once when the ice broke under him and he plunged into an icy lake — Cookie roused the other dogs and they pulled Mr. Paulsen from the water. After Mr. Paulsen decided to give up running sled dogs, he invited Cookie into his house. One of the first things Cookie did was to eat Mr. Paulsen’s wife’s pet cat. After Cookie died in 1989, Mr. Paulsen dedicated his book Woodsong to her.

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

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*******

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